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BOMB: The Race to Build-and Steal- the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon Nonfiction Book Study: TEKS

This book study provides curated information and guided reading and assignments for the book BOMB by Steve Sheinkin

TEKS

Principles of Technology:
(2)  The student uses a systematic approach to answer scientific laboratory and field investigative questions. The student is expected to:

(C)  know that scientific theories are based on natural and physical phenomena and are capable of being tested by multiple independent researchers. Unlike hypotheses, scientific theories are well-established and highly-reliable explanations, but may be subject to change as new areas of science and new technologies are developed;
(K)  communicate valid conclusions supported by the data through various methods such as lab reports, labeled drawings, graphic organizers, journals, summaries, oral reports, and technology-based reports; and
(L)  express and manipulate relationships among physical variables quantitatively, including the use of graphs, charts, and equations.

(3)  The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions within and outside the classroom. The student is expected to:
(A)  in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B)  communicate and apply scientific information extracted from various sources such as current events, news reports, published journal articles, and marketing materials;
(C)  draw inferences based on data related to promotional materials for products and services;
(D)  explain the impacts of the scientific contributions of a variety of historical and contemporary scientists on scientific thought and society;

(6)  The student uses critical-thinking, scientific-reasoning, and problem-solving skills. The student is expected to:
(A)  analyze and evaluate scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing;
(B)  communicate and apply scientific information;
(C)  explain the societal impacts of scientific contributions

(8)  The student describes the nature of forces in the physical world. The student is expected to:
(A)  research and describe the historical development of the concepts of gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces;
(I)  describe technological applications of the strong and weak nuclear forces in nature.

(12)  The student analyzes the concepts of atomic, nuclear, and quantum phenomena. The student is expected to:
(B)  compare and explain emission spectra produced by various atoms;
(C)  describe the significance of mass-energy equivalence and apply it in explanations of phenomena such as nuclear stability, fission, and fusion;
(D)  describe the role of mass-energy equivalence for areas such as nuclear stability, fission, and fusion; and
(E)  explore technology applications of atomic, nuclear, and quantum phenomena such as nanotechnology, radiation therapy, diagnostic imaging, and nuclear power.